Connect with us

Prescription Drugs

Metformin Not Recommended for Recall

mm

Published

on

The FDA doesn’t have any recommendations to recall the drug metformin, which is used to treat type 2 diabetes. The government agency had conducted testing on these products for evidence that they contained NDMA or N-nitrosodimethylamine at levels that were higher than acceptable.

NDMA has been found in various heartburn medications and drugs used to treat hypertension. Several drugs have been recalled in 2018 and 2019. According to the tests conducted by the FDA, the presence of NDMA was low to not detectable.

This is good news for those with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. According to statistics, over 30 million people have a diagnosis of diabetes in the United States with all but about 5 to 10 percent being listed as type 2. Metformin is one of the most popular treatment drugs in use. No one should stop taking the medication without talking to a medical professional, warns the FDA. It could be dangerous for their health to stop without supervision.

The FDA says it will continue to monitor for any future concerns. If the rate of NDMA exceeds the allowed amount in the future, it will issue a recall.

Other Impacts of NDMA

Metformin isn’t the first drug to be tested for the presence of NDMA. Zantac, a well-known OTC medication for heartburn, was recalled because of the levels of the chemical found in the product. Blood pressure medications also received the same scrutiny and tested too high for NDMA to be considered safe. They included valsartan, losartan and irbesartan. There are concerns that the chemical was present in some of these drugs for up to four years.

NDMA is an organic compound, which is often seen in cured foods or smoked meats. It’s also found in manufacturing as a by-product. One of the most alarming uses for this chemical is that it is used in scientific research to cause cancer in lab rats. Many experts believe it is a possible carcinogen for humans as well if it is found in a high enough concentration. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) indicates that it can lead to damage of the liver. While it is found in drinking water, the level is expected to be at seven nanograms per liter.

A high level of NDMA or chronic exposure to lower levels could potentially cause cancer. It is found naturally in certain foods and beer as well as the smoke from tobacco. These amounts are considered safe.

High levels in laboratory animals caused cancer of the liver and lung. In humans, it has been shown to cause internal bleeding and liver damage. This is one reason for the monitoring of drinking water because the chemical can get into the ground where it seeps into water. While NDMA breaks down quickly in sunlight, it can’t break down in the ground where no sunlight can penetrate. The FDA says it is unacceptable to find traceable amounts of the chemical in medications, which is why products are recalled for levels over the legal amount.

Comments
Continue Reading

Prescription Drugs

Increased Risk for Opioid Addiction and Relapse with Pandemic

mm

Published

on

Along with the illness, the coronavirus outbreak has many potential secondary concerns. One of these is the likelihood of increased numbers of opioid addicts and relapses.

Addiction Relapses

Most addicts attend some kind of meeting to help them maintain their recovery, whether it be Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous or another 12-step program. Now that the majority of those meetings and groups have been suspended, the only option is online recovery for a lot of the recovering addicts.

For many of the addicts, online works well. For others, it just isn’t the same. They may not have access to online resources. They often say there is a disconnect online compared to being in the same room with people.

Recovering addicts may feel isolated and suffer from depression along with anxiety because of COVID-19 and the restrictions of social distancing. Even though they understand the need for it, many will be faced with mental health issues. It is these same mental health issues that often lead to addiction in the first place.

Addiction is an isolating situation with people hiding their drug use from others around them. This situation makes it easier for them to continue the behaviors.

A common part of addiction treatment for opioids is methadone and other opioid prescriptions. These medications are given to help prevent the cravings that go along with withdrawal from opioids like heroin. The government has relieved the restrictions of taking the medication daily at a treatment clinic with doctors being able to give prescriptions for 14 or 28 days to take at home.

The problem with this solution is that active addicts may take more than they should and overdose or relapse. They have the entire 28-day supply at their disposal, and they may not be able to withstand the temptation to take extra, especially if they are experiencing anxiety or depression from being alone.

The Risk of Addiction

Those who are prescribed opioid painkillers may face a greater risk as well. While they are monitored for medication use, the anxiety they feel at this pandemic may lead them to experience more physical pain as well. They may self-medicate by increasing the dosage over what was prescribed.

When this happens, people are at a higher risk for developing a dependency on the drugs, which can lead to addiction. With the stay-at-home orders throughout the country, friends and family may not even be aware of changes in mood and behaviors to recognize the indications of addiction.

Risks with COVID-19

Drug users are often a higher risk for developing complications from the virus because of compromised immunity systems and lung damage due to drug abuse. Their withdrawal symptoms can also mask the symptoms of COVID-19, which would lessen the likelihood that they would seek medical attention as quickly as they should.

Medical professionals could also misdiagnose those with COVID-19 as drug withdrawal symptoms. It may take longer for an accurate diagnosis, which could increase the risk of serious health issues or even death.

Comments
Continue Reading

Prescription Drugs

Could Johnson & Johnson Start Testing a Vaccine by Fall?

mm

Published

on

Johnson & Johnson, a major pharmaceutical company, has made plans to begin clinical trials on people of a vaccine for Covid-19 that it has developed. The company suggests it could be ready by September with the first batches of the vaccine ready for public use in an emergency early in 2021.

Hope for a Successful Vaccine

The company stated it had started work on a vaccine for the coronavirus early in January. It is working with BARDA, Biomedical Advance Research and Development Authority, which is a part of the Department of Health and Human Services. The two partners are committing $1 billion for research and development of the vaccine, along with testing.

The chairman of Johnson & Johnson, Alex Gorsky, says his company wants to do what they can to bring a vaccine to the public as quickly as possible. Manufacturing capacity around the world will be expanded if its approved to begin producing the vaccine immediately.

Early tests show the vaccine to be both safe and effective. The hope is that the partnership with BARDA will allow the vaccine to move through testing and approval faster. If approved, the vaccine would be distributed as not-for-profit.

Other Treatments and Vaccines

Another company has also been working on a vaccine. Moderna, a biotech firm based in the US, shipped a test vaccine to the government in February. The first dose has already been administered in a clinical trial in March. It uses material from DNA, which is injected into the body. Immune cells begin to make proteins that mark the virus cells for destruction.

Testing has also begun on a drug which could be used to treat patients with Covid-19. This drug, known as remdesivir, has been used in treatment of Ebola. It was given in a test to a patient who has Covid-19 and is the first drug to be tested for treatment. Other people who have tested positive for the virus will be part of the study.

The study will include volunteers who will either be given the drug or a placebo and monitored. The drug will be given intravenously over a ten-day period. Tests will be taken every other day to determine the amount of the virus in the system. If the drug shows some ability to prevent the growth of the virus, it could reduce the spread of Covid-19.

Experts warn the public not to rely on these early tests to make vaccines available right away. Even if they are viable, it’s expected that it could take at least a year before they would be readily available to the general public. Before this, specific people, such as medical care workers, may have access. Other methods will be necessary to control the spread of the disease in the meantime. However, a treatment for the disease may reduce the death rate. Researchers are working diligently to develop solutions to the coronavirus, but it’s not expected to see dramatic results overnight.

Comments
Continue Reading

Prescription Drugs

Opioid Addiction Patients May Take Medications Home

mm

Published

on

The United States Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, otherwise known as SMAHSA, has made some significant policy changes for patients who are currently in an opioid treatment program. They are now allowed to take home medication due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Treatment Drugs Being Made Available to Recovering Addicts

Patients who are in a treatment program for opioid addiction may have the ability to take home medications, including buprenorphine and methadone. These medications are given to patients as part of the treatment plan. Treatment centers may send home a 28-day supply of the drugs. For those who aren’t quite as stable, they may request up to 14 days of medications.

These medications are given to patients to help wean them off opioid drugs. While the medications contain some opioid ingredients, it is at a lower rate than with heroin and other opioids. It can help the patient stop using drugs without the severe withdrawal symptoms often seen if they stop without the aid of medication. These medicines also help reduce cravings, which can mean the difference in relapse for the patient.

Doctors say it’s critical that patients have access to these medicines with the reality of fewer in-person visits while the pandemic continues. Without the medications, the patients are more likely to regress and return to their former drug use. They also have an increased risk for overdose.

While doctors say there is still some risk for overdose or even abuse of the drugs, the benefits outweigh the disadvantages. They believe it will be a great help to those who are stable in their treatment, but even those who are less stable will benefit, according to many experts.

Another change for drug treatment was announced recently from the Drug Enforcement Administration. Dispensing restrictions are being relaxed while the public health emergency lasts. Instead of just licensed doctors being able to administer or even dispense OUD medications, other professionals will also have that ability. This includes law enforcement and other treatment program staff members as well as members of the national guard.

How Buprenorphine and Methadone Work

Buprenorphine is given to people who are in treatment for opioid use disorder or OUD. It is generally given at the first signs of withdrawal symptoms. If given too soon, it can cause an acute withdrawal. The dosage is adjusted until the person has fewer or no symptoms. A maintenance dose is often continued through treatment.

Methadone is often given during detoxification to lessen withdrawal symptoms. It may also be used as part of maintenance because it helps people stay in treatment. It’s standard practice for the person to go to a treatment center daily to receive the methadone dose to risk them diverting the drug. The medication may be given for months or even years. In fact, some patients continue it throughout their lives to reduce the risk of relapse on heroin or other opioids.

The risk with these medications is in overdose or misuse because they are also opioids. In the time of a pandemic, it causes professionals to change the way they handle the drugs to provide the best care for those who are in treatment for opioid addiction.

Comments
Continue Reading

Trending